Tuesday, October 29, 2013

95 Theses for Christian Racial & Ethnic Unity: #93



Christian education in a context that is diverse in terms of gender, class, culture, and ethnicity requires a multicultural sensitive pedagogy, or a pedagogy of reconciliation. Such a pedagogy is part of creating a borderland or a space for the discovery of mutuality and common ground amid our differences. The goal of a reconciliation pedagogy is to facilitate a journey whereby we are sensitized to our assumptions about our culture in order to understand another culture’s content and context from within, even while we are without. It allows us to see the structural sin in each culture and how difference has been maintained for empowerment or disempowerment so that we might envision the healing and transformation of the world. Doing this is a process of border crossing that moves us from our ethnocentricities and prejudices to an appreciation of differences. This makes it possible for us to respect and learn from other cultures. It also enhances our ability to understand and interact with biblical texts, themselves a variation of cultures, and to relate them to our present changing realities.

Elizabeth Conde-Frazier, “Prejudice and Conversion,” in A Many Colored Kingdom: Multicultural Dynamics for Spiritual Formation, eds. Elizabeth Conde-Frazier, S. Steve Kang, and Gary A. Parrett (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2004), 105.

[Read the Introduction to 95 Theses for Christian Racial & Ethnic Unity here.]

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